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Spring Weather Lures Homebuyers into Market

by David DiGioia

Warmer weather brought homebuyers into the market and pushed pending home sales up 3.4% in March, data from the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® shows. NAR Chief Economist Lawrence Yun said a gain was inevitable.

“After a dismal winter, more buyers got an opportunity to look at homes last month and are beginning to make contract offers,” he said. “Sales activity is expected to steadily pick up as more inventory reaches the market, and from ongoing job creation in the economy.”

The March gain was the first uptick in pending home sales in the past nine months.

Regional pending home sales were mixed:

Although home sales are expected to trend up over the course of the year and into 2015, this year began on a weak note and total sales are unlikely to match the 2013 level.

Existing-home sales are expected to total more than 4.9 million this year, slightly below the nearly 5.1 million in 2013. However, with ongoing inventory shortages in much of the U.S., the national median existing-home price is expected to grow 6%-7% in 2014.



Read more: http://www.houselogic.com/blog/home-thoughts/spring-weather-lures-homebuyers-market/#ixzz32Drh0a7K 
 

11 Ways to Create a Welcoming Front Entrance for Under $100

by David DiGioia

Wouldn’t it be nice to approach your home’s entrance with a grin instead of a grimace? Take our tips for beating a clear, safe, and stylish path to your front door.

 

First impressions count — not just for your friends, relatives, and the UPS guy, but for yourself. Whether it’s on an urban stoop or a Victorian front porch, your front door and the area leading up to it should extend a warm welcome to all comers — and needn’t cost a bundle.

Here’s what you can do to make welcoming happen on the cheap.

1. Clear the way for curb appeal. The path to your front door should be at least 3 feet wide so people can walk shoulder-to-shoulder, with an unobstructed view and no stumbling hazards. So get out those loppers and cut back any overhanging branches or encroaching shrubs. 

2. Light the route. Landscape lighting makes it easy to get around at night. Solar-powered LED lights you can just stick in the ground, requiring no wiring, are suprisingly inexpensive. We found 8 packs for under $60 online. 

3. Go glossy. Borrow inspiration from London’s lovely row houses, whose owners assert their individuality by painting their doors in high-gloss colors. The reflective sheen of a royal blue, deep green, crimson, or whatever color you like will ensure your house stands out from the pack.

Related: Pictures of 10 Great Value-Add Exterior Paint Jobs

4. Pretty up the view. A door with lots of glass is a plus for letting light into the front hall — but if you also want privacy and a bit of decor, check out decorative window film. It’s removable and re-positionable, and comes in innumerable styles and motifs. Pricing depends on size and design; many available for under $30.

A way to get the look of stained glass without doing custom work or buying a whole new door: Mount a decorative panel on the inside of the door behind an existing glass insert, $92 for an Arts and Crafts-style panel 20-inches-high by 11-inches-wide.

5. Replace door hardware. While you’re at it, polish up the handle on the big front door. Or better yet, replace it with a shiny new brass lockset with a secure deadbolt. Available for about $60. 

6. Please knock. Doorbells may be the norm, but a hefty knocker is a classic that will never run out of battery life, and another opportunity to express yourself (whatever your favorite animal or insect is, there’s a door-knocker in its image). 

7. Ever-greenery. Boxwoods are always tidy-looking, the definition of easy upkeep. A pair on either side of the door is traditional, but a singleton is good, too. About $25 at garden centers. In cold climates, make sure pots are frost-proof (polyethylene urns and boxes mimic terracotta and wood to perfection).

8. Numbers game. Is your house number clearly visible? That’s of prime importance if you want your guests to arrive and your pizza to be hot. Stick-on vinyl numbers in a variety of fonts make it easy, starting at about $4 per digit.

9. Foot traffic. A hardworking mat for wiping muddy feet is a must. A thick coir mat can be had at the hardware store for less than $20. Even fancier varieties can be found well under $50.

10. Go for the glow. Fumbling for keys in the dark isn’t fun. Consider doubling up on porch lights with a pair of lanterns, one on each side of the door, for symmetry and twice the illumination. Many mounted lights are available well under $100.

11. Snail mail. Mailboxes run the gamut from kitschy roadside novelties masquerading as dogs, fish, or what-have-you to sober black lockboxes mounted alongside the front door. Whichever way you go, make sure yours is standing or hanging straight, with a secure closure, and no dings or dents. The mail carrier will thank you.



Read more: http://www.houselogic.com/home-advice/home-improvement/front-door-entry-ideas/#ixzz31kZ85dhZ 
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Charlotte home prices rise 8% from year ago

by David DiGioia

Charlotte-area home prices rose 8 percent in March from the same month last year, as low supplies of homes for sale continued to drive up prices nationwide, a report Tuesday showed.

March marked the 27th month in a row of annual increases in the Charlotte region, Irvine, Calif.-based CoreLogic said. Nationally, home prices rose 11.1 percent from a year ago, for the 25th month in a row of annual price gains.

Rising home prices nationwide, as well as tight inventories and tougher lending requirements, are becoming an increasing drag on the U.S. housing market, the report said.

“March data on new- and existing-home sales was weaker than expected and is a cause for concern as we enter the spring buying season,” Mark Fleming, chief economist for CoreLogic, said in a statement.

Inventories of homes remain stubbornly low in Charlotte and elsewhere. Last week, the National Association of Realtors said the national median price for existing homes is expected to increase by 6 to 7 percent this year because of inventory shortages in much of the U.S.

Industry observers blame the low inventory on multiple factors. Some potential sellers who bought at the peak of the housing market still owe more than their homes are worth and are waiting for prices to rise further before they sell. Also, some potential sellers are reluctant to list their homes while low supplies mean slim choices for their next home purchase.

CoreLogic’s figures include sales of distressed and nondistressed homes.


Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2014/05/06/4890866/charlotte-home-prices-rise-8-from.html#.U2mK9fldWO0#storylink=cpy

Read More: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2014/05/06/4890866/charlotte-home-prices-rise-8-from.html#.U2mK9fldWO0​

Charlotte Home Prices Rise, But at a Slower Pace

by David DiGioia

Charlotte-area home prices continued their rise in February, but the pace of appreciation again slowed, according to a report Tuesday.

Home values rose 6.7 percent in February from the year before, the latest Standard & Poor’s Case-Shiller index shows. That was slower than the national rate, which grew at 12.9 percent.

In January, Charlotte-area prices were up 7.2 percent over the previous year. Home values declined slightly between January and February this year.


Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2014/04/29/4873726/charlotte-home-prices-rise-but.html#storylink=cpy

Read More: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2014/04/29/4873726/charlotte-home-prices-rise-but.html#.U2PohPldWO0 

Displaying blog entries 1-4 of 4

Contact Information

Photo of David DiGioia Real Estate
David DiGioia
Realty Executives Unlimited
17718 Kings Point Dr, Suite B
Cornelius NC 28031
704-506-6434
Fax: (866)476-8652